Reasons to retain your coverage into your retirement years.

Do you need a life insurance policy in retirement? One school of thought questions this decision. Perhaps your kids have grown, and the need to help protect the household against the loss of an income-earner has passed.

If you are thinking about dropping your coverage for either or both of those reasons, you may want to ask yourself a few additional questions before moving forward.

Remember that several factors will affect the cost and availability of life insurance, including age, health, and the type and amount of insurance purchased. Life insurance policies have expenses, including mortality and other charges. If a policy is surrendered prematurely, the policyholder also may pay surrender charges and have income tax implications. You should consider determining whether you are insurable before implementing a strategy involving life insurance. Any guarantees associated with a policy are dependent on the ability of the issuing insurance company to continue making claim payments.

Does your policy have a cash value? If you have a whole life policy, it may have built a cash value over time. Whole life insurance is designed to remain in force for your whole life, as long as you remain current with your premiums. Before surrendering a whole-life policy, be certain you understand the policy’s features and limitations.

This article is for informational purposes only and is not a replacement for real-life advice, so you may want to consider asking for guidance from a financial professional before modifying your life insurance strategy. Life insurance is not insured by the FDIC (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation). It is not insured by any federal government agency, bank, or savings association.

Do you anticipate paying estate taxes? If the value of your estate exceeds federal or state estate tax thresholds, you may owe estate taxes. Life insurance proceeds may help your heirs manage the tax situation, and could prevent the need to sell other assets. Estate tax laws are constantly changing, so you may want to consider speaking with a legal professional, who can provide information on potential legislative changes.

Are you carrying a mortgage? If you borrowed to purchase your home or have refinanced and are carrying a mortgage, the proceeds for a life insurance policy may help your heirs manage the mortgage payments.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright FMG Suite.

Learn when it may not make sense to file a claim on your home insurance.

Insurance is meant to protect you against financial loss. But is it really meant to protect you from any and all financial loss? When it comes to filing a loss claim on your home insurance, there may be times when not filing may be the wisest course of action.1

According to one study, the national average premium increase after filing a homeowners insurance claim is 9%, although this number varies depending on your specific location.2

What About My Premium?

Some insurance companies may protect you against premium increases. However, if filing a claim means your premium will rise, you may need to decide whether it makes sense to do it.

It may not pay to file a claim if:

  • The claim amount is small. Your policy will have a deductible, so even claims of $1,000 to $2,000 may not have a favorable long-term cost benefit.
  • You’re not covered for a loss. Read your policy first to determine coverage. The simple act of filing a claim (even for a claim that won’t be paid) may result in higher premiums.
  • You have filed a claim within the last seven years. Since previous claims are tracked by an industry database for seven years, it may result in higher premiums.

Another factor to consider: you may want to file a claim regardless of dollar amount if someone is injured on your property, in order to protect yourself in the event that you are sued by the injured party.

1. Several factors will affect the cost of homeowners insurance, including the location, size, and contents in the home. You should consider the amount of your deductible and level of coverage before purchasing a policy. Any guarantees associated with a policy are dependent on the ability of the issuing insurance company to continue making claim payments.
2. InsuranceQuotes.com, 2022
The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright FMG Suite.

In the event of an unforeseen accident or illness, disability insurance may be a good way to protect your income and savings.

The Social Security Disability Insurance program paid out over $140 billion in benefits in 2021. And with new applicants each year, the system is expected to exhaust its reserves at the end of 2034 if changes aren’t made.1,2

Rather than depending on a government program to protect their income in the event of a disability, many individuals prefer to protect themselves with personal disability insurance.3
Disability insurance provides protection by replacing a portion of your income, usually up to 60 percent, if you become disabled as a result of an injury or illness. This type of insurance may have considerable benefits since a disability can be a two-fold financial problem. Those who become disabled often find they are unable to work and are also saddled with unexpected medical expenses.4

What About Workers Comp?

Many people think of workers compensation as a disability safety net. But workers compensation pays benefits only to individuals who become disabled while at work. If your disability is the result of a car accident or other off-the-job activity, you may not qualify for workers compensation.

Even with workers compensation, each state makes its own rules about payment and benefits, so coverage may vary considerably. You might consider finding out what your state offers and plan to supplement coverage on your own, if necessary, especially if you have a high-risk profession. Likewise, if you have an active lifestyle that puts you at a higher risk of disability, considering an extra layer of protection may be a sound financial decision.

If you become disabled, personal disability insurance can be structured to pay a benefit weekly or monthly. And benefits may not be taxable if you have paid the premiums in full with after-tax dollars.4,5

When you purchase a policy, you may be able to tailor coverage to suit your needs. For example, you might be able to adjust benefits or elimination periods. You might opt for comprehensive protection or decide to define coverage more specifically. Some policies also offer partial disability coverage, cost-of-living adjustments, residual benefits, survivor benefits, and pension supplements. Since coverage is designed to replace income, many people choose to purchase protection only during their working years.

Even as changes are made to federal disability programs, they typically provide only modest supplemental income, and qualifying can be difficult. If you don’t want to rely solely on Uncle Sam in the event of an unforeseen accident or illness, disability insurance may be a sound way to protect your income and savings.

Out of Commission

According to the most recent data available, about 19.1 percent of working-age disabled Americans are employed.

Source: BLS.gov, 2022

1. SSA.gov, 2022
2. SSA.gov, 2022
3. Disability insurance is issued by participating insurance companies. Not all policy types and product features are available in all states. Any obligations are dependent on the ability of the issuing insurance company to continue making claim payments.
4. Investopedia.com, 2022
5. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Federal and state laws and regulations are subject to change, which would have an impact on after-tax investment returns. Please consult a professional with legal or tax experience for specific information regarding your individual situation.
The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright FMG Suite.

Overview of Medicare Advantage, what’s in them, special rules, and more.

Medicare Advantage, sometimes known as “Part C,” is something of a catch-all choice for those who are ready to sign up for Medicare. Medicare Advantage plans are offered by private insurers in conjunction with the Medicare program, and can provide you with additional health insurance coverage.

What’s in them?

In addition to signing up for Medicare Part A (hospital stays) and Part B (medical coverage), Medicare Advantage plans offer their subscribers extra features. This frequently, but not always, includes the Medicare Part D prescription drug plan.1

In some cases, Medicare Advantage plans offer coverage for areas not normally offered within regular Medicare plans. This can include dental, hearing, and vision insurance.1

What are the rules?

Medicare pays for a fixed amount of your health care to the company offering your Medicare Advantage (MA) plan. Beyond that, each MA plan requires different out-of-pocket fees. Those fees can vary from plan to plan.1

Depending on your plan, you may have different rules you need to follow when seeking a medical referral to get treatment from a specialist or if you are seeking non-urgent care (even from health care providers within the plan).

It’s also important to remember that rules, requirements, and features may change from year to year. It will be important to make sure that those changes line up with any treatment that you need.

What about my prescriptions?

While most MA plans offer Part D coverage for prescription drugs, some don’t. One example would be for Medicare Medical Savings Account plans. In cases where the plan can’t or chooses not to offer prescription drug coverage, you may have the ability to join a separate Medicare Prescription Drug Plan, depending on the type of plan you enroll in.1

You will likely have a number of questions and concerns as you examine your options for Medicare Advantage plans. Discuss these with a trusted financial professional who can help you make choices that may best fit your lifestyle.

1. Medicare.gov, 2022
The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright FMG Suite.

Whole life insurance remains in force as long as you remain current with premiums. Here’s how it works.

Insurance Benefits Graphic

In exchange for fixed premiums, an insurance company promises to pay a set benefit when the policyholder dies, but also offers additional benefits as well. Whole life insurance policies can build up cash value — effectively a cash reserve that pays a modest rate of return, and the growth is tax-deferred. Guarantees are based on the claims-paying ability of the issuing company.

  Policy Loan Graphic

Most whole life insurance policies allow policyholders to borrow a portion of their policy’s cash value. Access to the cash value can allow you to pay for things like college expenses, a home down payment, or any other needs you may have. Interest payments on policy loans go directly back into the policy’s cash value.

Insurance Benefits Graphic

When the policyholder dies, his or her beneficiaries receive the benefit from the policy. Depending on how the policy is structured, benefits may or may not be taxable.

Whether whole life insurance is the best choice for you may depend on a variety of factors, including your goals or circumstances.

When you borrow against this cash value of your policy, there are some important points to consider. Accessing the cash value of the insurance policy through borrowing — or partial surrenders — has the potential to reduce the policy’s cash value and benefit. Accessing the cash value may also increase the chance that the policy will lapse and may result in a tax liability if the policy terminates before your death.

As with all types of life insurance, several factors will affect the cost and availability of whole life insurance, including age, health, and the type and amount of insurance purchased. Life insurance policies have expenses, including mortality and other charges. If a policy is surrendered prematurely, the policyholder may also pay surrender charges and have income tax implications. You should consider determining whether you are insurable before implementing a strategy involving life insurance. Any guarantees associated with a policy are dependent on the ability of the issuing insurance company to continue making claim payments.

Life insurance is not insured by the FDIC (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation). It is not insured by any federal government agency or bank or savings association.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright FMG Suite.

Whether you have life insurance through your work or are retired it pays to know the truth about life insurance coverage.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright FMG Suite.
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