Did you know that there are benefits and limitations when you decide to donate stock? Learn more about your options.

Key Takeaways

  • Some universities and major hospitals have huge endowments while your local shelter may struggle to keep its doors open. Sometimes finding smaller charities with bigger needs may increase the impact of your donation.
  • Donating stock can provide potential tax benefits, especially if you have owned the securities for at least one year.
  • While cash gifts are generally deductible up to 50% of adjusted gross income, the actual tax savings may vary based on your tax bracket and state taxes.

Why sell shares when you can gift them? If you have appreciated stocks in your portfolio, you might want to consider donating those shares to charity rather than selling them.

Donating appreciated securities to a tax-qualified charity may allow you to manage your taxes and benefit the charity. If you have held the stock for more than a year, you may be able to deduct from your taxes the fair market value of the stock in the year that you donate. If the charity is tax-exempt, it may not face capital gains tax on the stock if it sells it in the future.1

Keep in mind this article is for informational purposes only. It’s not a replacement for real-life advice. Make sure to consult your tax and legal professionals before modifying your gift-giving strategy.

“The greatest donor satisfaction may come with a combination of time and money.”

There are several reasons to consider donating highly appreciated stock to a tax-exempt charity. For example, you may own company stock and have the opportunity to donate some shares. There also are potential tax benefits to consider if you donate appreciated securities that you have owned for at least one year.

If you sell shares of appreciated stock from a taxable account and subsequently donate the proceeds from the sale to charity, you may face capital gains tax on any gain you realize, which effectively trims the benefit of cash donation.1

When is donating cash a choice to consider? If you provide the charity with a cash gift, there may be some limitations. Cash gifts are generally deductible up to 50% of adjusted gross income. As an example, if a donor in the top 37% federal tax bracket gives a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization a gift of $5,000, the net may be $3,150 with $1,850 realized in tax savings. A donor should also need to consider state taxes in addition to federal.2

If you donate shares of depreciated stock from a taxable account to a charity, you can only deduct their current value, not the value they had when you originally bought them.1

Picture1

Remember the tax rules for charitable donations. If you donate appreciated stock to a charity, you may want to review IRS Publication 526, Charitable Contributions. Double-check to see that the charity has non-profit status under federal tax law, and be sure to record the deduction on a Schedule A that you attach to your 1040.1

If your contribution totals $250 or more, the donation must be recorded – that is, the charity needs to give you a written statement describing the donation and its value and whether it is providing you with goods or services in exchange for it.2

If your total deduction for all non-cash contributions in a tax year exceeds $500, then complete and attach Form 8283 (Noncash Charitable Contributions) to your 1040 when filing. If you donate more than $5,000 of property to a charity, you will need to provide a letter from a qualified appraiser to the charity (and by extension, the IRS) stating the monetary value of the gift(s).2

Gifting cash or other assets to an organization is a wonderful opportunity. But keep in mind that tax rules are constantly being adjusted, and there’s a possibility that the current rules may change. Make certain to consult your tax and legal professionals before starting a new gifting strategy.

1. IRS.gov, 2023
2. IRS.gov, 2023
The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG, LLC, is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright FMG Suite.

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has released new limits for certain retirement accounts for the coming year.

Keep in mind that this update is for informational purposes only, so please consult with an accounting or tax professional before making any changes to your 2024 tax strategy. You can also contact your financial professional, who may be able to provide you with information about the pending changes.

Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs)

Traditional IRA contribution limits are up $500 in 2024 to $7,000. Catch-up contributions for those over age 50 remain at $1,000, bringing the total limit to $8,000.

Remember, once you reach age 73, you must begin taking required minimum distributions from a Traditional IRA in most circumstances. Withdrawals are taxed as ordinary income and, if taken before age 59½, may be subject to a 10% federal income tax penalty.

Roth IRAs

The income phase-out range for Roth IRA contributions increases to $146,000-$161,000 for single filers and heads of household, an $8,000 increase. For married couples filing jointly, the phase-out will be $230,000-$240,000, a $12,000 increase. Married individuals filing separately see their phase-out range remain at $0-10,000.

To qualify for the tax-free and penalty-free withdrawal of earnings, Roth 401(k) distributions must meet a five-year holding requirement and occur after age 59½. Tax-free and penalty-free withdrawal can also be taken under certain other circumstances, such as the owner’s death.

Workplace Retirement Accounts

Those with 401(k), 403(b), 457 plans, and similar accounts will see a $500 increase for 2024, the limit rising to $23,000. Those aged 50 and older will continue to have the ability to contribute an extra $7,500, bringing their total limit to $30,500.

Once you reach age 73 you must begin taking required minimum distributions from your 401(k) or other defined-contribution plans in most circumstances. Withdrawals are taxed as ordinary income and, if taken before age 59½, may be subject to a 10% federal income tax penalty.

SIMPLE Accounts

A $500 increase in limits for 2024 gives individuals contributing to this incentive match plan a $16,000 stoplight.

Much like a traditional IRA, once you reach age 73, you must begin taking required minimum distributions from a SIMPLE account in most circumstances. Withdrawals are taxed as ordinary income and, if taken before age 59½, may be subject to a 10% federal income tax penalty.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG, LLC, is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright FMG Suite.

If you want to avoid potential surprises at tax time, it may make sense to know where you stand when it comes to the AMT.

American educational reformer Horace Mann called education “the great equalizer.” In football, it’s been said that turnovers are the great equalizer. In taxes, there’s also an equalizer of sorts; it’s called the alternative minimum tax, or AMT. Instituted in 1969, it was intended to ensure that the very rich didn’t pay a lower effective tax rate than everyone else.1

In recent years, however, the “very rich” weren’t the only ones who needed to be concerned about the AMT. Because the AMT was not indexed for inflation until 2013, millions of middle-class Americans were being forced to pay it. Thanks to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, that number is falling, once again. Per the most recent data available, only 0.1% of taxpayers pay the AMT.1,2

What Is The AMT, Exactly?

It may be easiest to think of the AMT as a separate tax system with a unique set of rules for deductions, which are more restrictive than those in the traditional tax system.
The only way to know for sure if you qualify for the AMT is to fill out Form 6251 from the Internal Revenue Service. It may be worth doing just to be sure, especially if you are a high income earner who can claim sizable tax breaks.

If you should have paid the AMT and the IRS discovers that you didn’t, you may owe back taxes and could also have to pay interest and/or penalties.

The AMT Language

Because the AMT system has complicated rules and provisions, it’s a good idea to consider consulting legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. And remember, the information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties.

If you want to avoid any potential surprises at tax time, it may make sense to know where you stand when it comes to the AMT. The time and energy you spend today may be worth the investment.

Where Does All That Money Go?

Here’s a breakdown of how the federal government spends its revenues.

Source: Treasury.gov, 2022
1. TheBalance.com, April 6, 2022
2. The Tax Policy Center, 2022 (2019 is the latest data available)

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG, LLC, is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright FMG Suite.
css.php